SUMMARIES AND HIGHLIGHTS OF


THE WORKES OF THE MOST HIGH AND MIGHTIE PRINCE,
IAMES, BY THE GRACE OF GOD,
KING OF GREAT BRITAINE, FRANCE AND IRELAND,
DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, & C.



The Workes, first published in 1616 (with two additional workes appended in 1620) is a fascinating collection of the writings of King James VI & I, founding monarch of Great Britain and the king who commanded the translation of the Authorized Version of the holy scriptures (also known as the Authorized King James Version of the Bible). Fortunately, this little known and hard-to-find volume is now online to read (http://books.google.com/books?id=CCa7-IVqhbEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Workes+of+the+Most+High+and+Mightie+Prince&cd=7#v=onepage&q=&f=false). The Workes can also be read at this link (slower loading).

The article that you are now reading is designed to be an help and an introduction to this amazing--and timely--collection of writings. The king is a delight to read--his writing is clear and to the point. In the Workes, we find that King James has a message that Rome does not want you to hear. There are sure to be surprises here for those unacquainted with these writings and meat for those with ears to hear.

READING HELPS FOR THOSE UNFAMILIAR
WITH JACOBEAN SPELLING & TYPOGRAPHY

          SPELLING
The English of King James' time is considered modern English and can be understood by English speakers today. Although Jacobean spellings can vary somewhat from today's spellings, many reading difficulties are easily overcome if one looks at the context of the sentence and/or reads the word phonetically, e.g., morall=moral, hower-glasse=hourglass, doune=down, lyon=lion, etc. Jacobean spelling is not standardized; in the same paragraph you can find "mainetained" and "maintained" but this in no way affects readability.

          TYPOGRAPHY
Here are a few examples of differences in typography:

  • J can be typed as J or I; (James=Iames, subject=subiect)
  • U can be typed as U or V; (inauguration=inavgvration)
  • V can be typed as V or U; (crave=craue)
  • W can be typed as W or VV; (sword=svvord)
  • Lowercase "s" can look like lowercase "f"; however, the s may not be as markedly crossed as the f.


SUMMARIES & HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WORKES
(in order of their appearance)

TO THE THRICE ILLVSTRIOVS AND MOST EXCELLENT PRINCE, CHARLES, THE ONELY SONNE1 OF OUR SOVERAIGNE LORD THE KING
In dedicating The Workes to Prince Charles, publisher IA. Winton2 notes, "...that of these Workes, some were out before; some other of them neuer saw light before; and others were almost lost and gone, or at least abused by false copies, to their owne disgrace and his Maiesties great dishonour....I thought it might sort well...to gather these things that were scattered, and to bring to light those that too long had lien in darknes, to preserve in one body, what might easily haue been lost in parts."

1By the time that The Workes was published, Charles was James' only remaining son.
2IA. Winton is a reference to James, Bishop of Winton, publisher of The Workes. In both the Epistle Dedicatorie and the Preface to the Reader he signs his name, "IA. Winton."


THE PREFACE TO THE READER
In this weighty introduction, IA. Winton relates the calumniations that reached his ears as he compiled The Workes--"...while I am collecting workes one way, I hear others scattering wordes as fast an other way, affirming, it had beene better his Maiestie had neuer written any Bookes at all...For, say these Men, Little it befitts the Maiesty of a King to turne Clerke...." IA. Winton then answers the king's detractors by citing numerous examples of great men throughout history who have put pen to paper. In so doing, he whisks the reader away on a vast historical journey beginning in ancient times and finally culminating with King James VI & I. Also included in his preface are insightful comments on James' writings, his reign, and his family.


THE SEVERALL TREATISES ACCORDING TO THE TIME WHEREIN THEY WERE WRITTEN, AND THEIR PLACE IN THIS COLLECTION, &C.
This is a table of contents of James' works that follow. Of note, it does not list the page numbers for the introductory materials for each work, e.g., it lists the Paraphrase of the Revelation as beginning on page 7, but does not list its Epistle Dedicatory (page 1) nor its Argument (page 4). It also does not list the last two works found in the present volume, which, beginning in 1620, were appended to The Workes.


A PARAPHRASE VPON THE REVELATION OF THE APOSTLE S. IOHN [c. 1586, Workes pp. 1-72]
James paraphrases the entire book of Revelation, verse-by-verse. For the purpose of making, "...the Discourse more short and facile," James makes John the speaker of the entire paraphrase.

         THE EPISTLE TO THE WHOLE CHVRCH MILITANT3, IN WHATSOEVER PART OF THE EARTH
In this epistle, James states his reasons for writing the Paraphrase of the Revelation-- "I doubt not but it will seeme strange to many, that any of my aage4, calling, and literature, should haue medled with so obscure, Theologicall, and high a subiect: But let my earnest desire (by manifesting the Trueth,) as well as to teach my selfe as others, serve for excuse; considering also that where divers others in our aage, haue medled with the interpretation of this Booke, pressing with preoccupied opinions, onely to wrest and conforme the meaning thereof to their particular and priuate passions; I by the contrary protest, that all my trauiles tend to square and conforme my opinions to the trew and sincere meaning thereof: Which causes mooued me to undertake this worke...."

          THE ARGVMENT OF THIS WHOLE EPISTLE
James orients the reader by dividing the Bible into several principal parts beginning with Adam's defection in Genesis and culminating with the prophesy of the Revelation. He then divides the book of Revelation into six principal parts--each focusing on some aspect of the end-times church.

          A PARAPHRASE VPON THE REVELATION OF THE APOSTLE S. IOHN
IA. Winton comments, "...I will make bolde to proceed a little with his Maiesties Paraphrase upon the Reuelation....His Maiesties singular understanding in all points of good Learning is not unknowne: But yet aboue all other things, GOD hath giuen him an understanding Heart in the interpretation of that Booke, beyond the measure of other men...."

3Militant, a. ...The church militant is the Christian church on earth...distingquished from the church triumphant, or in heaven. (Webster's 1828 Dictionary)
4"...[T]his Paraphrase...was written by his Maiestie before hee was twenty yeeres of age...." (IA. Winton, Preface to the Reader)


A FRVITFVLL MEDITATION, CONTAINING A PLAINE AND EASIE EXPOSITION, OR LAYING OPEN OF THE VII. VIII. IX. AND X. VERSES OF THE 20. CHAPTER OF THE REVELATION, IN THE FORME AND MANER OF A SERMON [1588, Workes pp. 73-80]
James describes end times characterized by the loosing of Satan and the raising up of, "...so many new errors and notable euill instruments, especially the Antichrist and his Clergie, who not onely infect the earth a new, but rule also ouer the whole, through the decrease of trew doctrine, and the number of the faithful following it, and the dayly increase of errours, and the nations following them, and beleeuing lies hating the trewth, and taking pleasure in vnrighteousness...."


A MEDITATION VPON THE XXV. XXVJ. XXVIJ. XXVIIJ. AND XXIX. VERSES OF THE XV. CHAP. OF THE FIRST BOOKE OF THE CHRONICLES OF THE KINGS [Workes pp. 81-89]
James uses the Biblical account of King David bringing home the ark to exhort his people to be thankful for God's deliverance from their enemies, to remain grounded in Jesus Christ alone, and to beware of hypocrites.


DAEMONOLOGIE, IN FORME OF A DIALOGVE, DIUIDED INTO THREE BOOKES [1597, Workes pp. 91-136]
James labors to prove that, "...assaultes of Sathan are most certainly practized, & that the instruments thereof, merits most severly to be punished...." IA. Winton calls Daemonologie, "...a rare peece for many Precepts and Experiments, both in Diuinitie and Naturall Philosophie."

          THE PREFACE TO THE READER
James explains his reason for writing--"The fearefull aboundinge at this time in this countrie, of these detestable slaues of the Deuill, the Witches or enchaunters, hath moved me (beloued reader) to dispatch in post, this following treatise of mine...."

          DAEMONOLOGIE, IN FORME OF A DIALOGVE. FIRST BOOKE. ARGVMENT. THE EXORD OF THE WHOLE. THE DESCRIPTION OF MAGIE IN SPECIALL.

          THE SECOND BOOKE OF DAEMONOLOGIE. ARGVMENT. THE DESCRIPTION OF SORCERIE AND WITCHCRAFT IN SPECIALL.

          THE THIRD BOOKE OF DAEMONOLOGIE. ARGVMENT. THE DESCRIPTION OF ALL THESE KINDS OF SPIRITS THAT TROUBLE MEN OR WOMEN. THE CONCLUSION OF THE WHOLE DIALOGUE.
Daemonologie deals with the kingdom of devils--their deeds, the sorcerers who conjure them, the victims they torment, etc.


ΒΑΣΙΛΙΚΟΝ ΔΩΡΟΝ OR HIS MAIESTIES INSTRVCTIONS TO HIS DEAREST SONNE, HENRY THE PRINCE [1599, Workes pp. 137-189]
In Basilicon Doron--the Kingly Gift--James instructs his young son, Prince Henry, in the ways of kingship.

         THE ARGUMENT
A short sonnet exhorting Henry, as king, to fear God, reward the just, and punish the profane.

         TO HENRY MY DEAREST SONNE, AND NATVRAL SVCCESSOVR
A warm dedicatory epistle directed to Prince Henry.

          TO THE READER
James explains that Basilicon Doron was not meant for public consumption and that forgeries of the book have forced him to, "publish and spread the true copies thereof5." James then addresses the two primary points of contention and misunderstanding that had arisen over the book--his harsh comments about the Puritans and his perceived desire for vengeance against England for his mother's execution.

          OF A KINGS CHRISTIAN DVETIE TOWARDS GOD. THE FIRST BOOKE
          OF A KINGS DVETIE IN HIS OFFICE. THE SECOND BOOKE
          OF A KINGS BEHAVIOVR IN INDIFFERENT THINGS. THE THIRD BOOKE

IA. Winton describes Basilicon Doron as, "...a Booke so singularly penned; that a Pomegranat is not so full of kernells, as that is of Excellent Counsells: What applause had it in the world? How did it inflame mens minds to a loue and admiration of his Maiestie beyond measure; Insomuch that comming out iust at the time his Maiestie came in, it made the hearts of all his people as one Man, as much to Honour him for Religion and Learning, as to obey him for Title and Authoritie; and gaue us then a taste, or rather the first fruits, of that we have since reaped a plentifull Haruest of, by his Maiesties most prudent and Gracious Gouernment ouer us."

5Basilicon Doron met with high demand in England and was eventually translated into a number of languages such as French, Latin, Dutch, Swedish, and German.


THE TREW LAW OF FREE MONARCHIES: OR THE RECIPROCK AND MVTVALL DVETIE BETWIXT A FREE KING, AND HIS NATURALL SUBIECTS [1598, Workes pp. 191-210]
James explains his reason for writing, "I haue chosen...onely to set downe in this short Treatise, the trew grounds of the mutuall duetie, and alleageance betwixt a free and absolute Monarche, and his people...."


A COVNTERBLASTE TO TOBACCO [1604, Workes pp. 211-222]
Commonly referred to as the first anti-smoking tract, Counterblaste is a polemic against tobacco smoking.


A DISCOVRSE OF THE MANER OF THE DISCOVERIE OF THE POWDER-TREASON, JOYNED WITH THE EXAMINATION OF SOME OF THE PRISONERS [1606, Workes pp. 223-246]
James unravels the mystery behind the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, a plan fomented by Roman Catholic conspirators to blow up James and Parliament.

Note: In 1606, as a result of the infamous Gunpowder Plot, Parliament issued legislation that included the Oath of Allegiance6 in which Roman Catholics pledged their loyalty to the king and renounced recusancy. The Oath drew reactions from far and wide. Even the pope himself weighed in on the matter. The next three works below center around the controversy.


TRIPLICI NODO, TRIPLEX CUNEUS7 OR AN APOLOGIE FOR THE OATH OF ALLEGIANCE AGAINST THE TWO BREVES OF POPE PAVLVS QVINTVS, AND THE LATE LETTER OF CARDINALL BELLARMINE TO G. BLACKWEL THE ARCH-PRIEST [1607, Workes pp. 247-286]
IA. Winton writes, "...after the Pope had put forth his Breues, and the Cardinall had sent his Letters to the Arch-priest; the one to enioyne the People not to take the Oath of Allegiance, affirming they could not take it with the safety of their saluation; the other to reproue the Arch-priest for that hee had taken it...His Maiestie like as became a Prudent and a Religious Prince, thought it not meete, that these things should passe for current, but that it was expedient his People should know, that the taking of this Oath...intended nothing but ciuill Obedience....[T]he Kings Penne ranne so fast, that in the compasse of sixe dayes, his Maiestie had accomplished that, which hee now calleth his Apologie...."

After its publication, the Apologie for the Oath of Allegiance stirred up yet more controversy. IA. Winton writes, "...as soone as his Maiestie dealt against the Pope, tooke the Cardinall in hand, made the world see the usurped power of the one, and Sophistry of the other...what a stirre we had; what roaring of the wild Bulls of Basan, what a commotion in every Countrey; Insomuch, that I thinke, there is scarce a People, Language or Nation in Christendome, out of which his Maiestie hath not received some answere or other; either by way of refuting, or at least by rayling...."

Maurus Lunn, member of the Benedictine order, said this about the ensuing controversy, "Fought by paper tigers, it was a paper war that penetrated every corner of Europe, the like of which will probably never be seen again...."

6A copy of the Oath of Allegiance is found in the first papal breve of Triplici Nodo, Triplex Cuneus (the next work).
7Triplici Nodo, Triplex Cuneus means, "To the Triple Knot a Triple Wedge." The triple knot represents three letters--two papal breves plus Cardinal Bellarmine's letter. The triple wedge represents James' three responses to the knots.


A PREMONITION TO ALL MOST MIGHTIE MONARCHES, KINGS, FREE PRINCES, AND STATES OF CHRISTENDOME [Workes pp. 287-338]
James warns his fellow princes of the papal threat to royal authority. He refers to them as, "loving brethren and cosins," and himself as, "Iames...Professour, Maintainer and Defender of the Trew, Christian, Catholique8 and Apostolique Faith...."

IA. Winton explains what prompted this follow-up to the Apologie for the Oath of Allegiance--"After that the Apologie was out, his Maiestie diverse times would bee pleased to utter a Resolution of his; that if the Pope and Cardinall would not rest in his answere, and sit downe by it; take the Oath as it was intended for a point of Allegiance and Ciuill Obedience; Hee would publish the Apologie in his owne name with a Preface to all the Princes in Christendome; wherein he would publish such a Confession of Faith, perswade the Princes so to vindicate their owne Power, discover so much of the Mysterie of Iniquitie unto them; as the Popes Bulles should pull in their hornes, and himselfe wish he had neuer medled with this matter. The Cardinall contending against the Apologie, his Maiestie confirmed his Resolution, and...in the compasse of one weeke, wrote his Monitory9 Preface...and being so written, published it and the Apologie in his owne Name; and made good his word, sent it to the Emperour and all the Kings and free Princes in Christendome."

IA. Winton assesses the results of the Premonition--

"First, upon the comming foorth of that Booke, there were no States, that disauowed the Doctrine of it in that point of the Kings power; And the Venetians mainetained it in their writings, and put it in Execution; The Sorbons maintained it likewise in France.

"Secondly, their own writers that opposed it, so ouerlashed, as they were corrected and castigated of men of their owne Religion; Becanus his Booke corrected by the Cardinalles of Rome; Bellarmines Booke burnt in Paris; Suarez his Answere burnt also in France....

"Thirdly, his Maiesties Confession of faith, hath bene so generally approued, as it hath conuerted many of their partie: And had it not bene (as I haue bene informed by diuerse) for the Treatise of Antichrist, many more would easily haue bene induced, to subscribe to all in that Preface.

"Fourthly, Kings and Princes have by his Maiesties Premonition, had a more cleare insight, and a more perfect discovery into the Injury offered them by the Pope in the point of their temporal Power, then euer they had; Insomuch, as that point was never so throughly disputed in Christendome, as it hath bene by the occasion of his Maiesties Booke.

"Fiftly and lastly, for the point of Antichrist; I haue heard many confesse, that they neuer saw so much light giuen to that Mysterie, neuer descerned so much trewth by the uniforme consent of the Text, and strength of Interpretation of places, as they haue done by his Maiesties Booke...."

8James refers to the primitive use of the word Catholic meaning universal. This is confirmed in other places, e.g., in his 1603 speech when referring to Roman Catholics he comments, "...falsely called Catholikes, but trewly Papists..." (Workes, p. 490). Catholic, a. Universal or general...Originally this epithet was given to the Christian Church in general, but is now appropriated to the Romish church... (Webster's 1828)
9Monitory, a. Giving admonition; warning; instructing by way of caution. (Webster's 1828)


A CATALOGVE OF THE LYES OF TORTVS, TOGETHER WITH A BRIEFE CONFUTATION OF THEM [Workes pp. 339-346]
Point-by-point, James refutes Tortus' (whom James identifies as cardinal Bellarmine) comments on the Oath of Allegiance, the Gunpowder Plot, etc.


A DECLARATION CONCERNING THE PROCEEDINGS WITH THE STATES GENERALL, OF THE UNITED PROVINCES OF THE LOW COVNTREYS, IN THE CAUSE OF D. CONRADVS VORSTIVS [Workes pp. 347-380]
The king rehearses Great Britain's, "sundry Instances and Requests vnto the States Generall of the Vnited Prouinces, for the banishment of a wretched Heretique, or rather Athiest, out of their Dominions, named D. Conradus Vorstius...," a theologian. In following up the king's letters to the States General, the British ambassador writes, "...what is it to his Maiestie, whether D. Vorstius be admitted Professor in the Vniuersitie of Leyden, or not? or whether the doctrine of Arminius bee preached in your Churches? saving that as a Christian Prince, he desires the aduancement of the Gospel...."


A REMONSTRANCE FOR THE RIGHT OF KINGS, AND THE INDEPENDANCE OF THEIR CROWNES, AGAINST AN ORATION OF THE MOST ILLVSTRIOVS CARD. OF PERRON, PRONOVNCED IN THE CHAMBER OF THE THIRD ESTATE. IAN. 15 1615 [Workes pp. 381-484]
James refutes an oration given by the Lord Cardinall of Perron who seeks to, "...draw that doctrine into all hatred and infamie, which teacheth Kings to be indeposeable by the Pope."

          THE PREFACE
James says he is bestirred to comment on French matters due to, "...my late entire affection to K. Henry IV...and my exceeding sorrow for the most detestable parricide acted upon the sacred person of a King...as also the remembrance of my owne dangers, incurred by the practice of conspiracies flowing from the same source....[I]n case the power and vertue of my aduertisements be not able effectually to worke, at least many millions of children and people yet unborne shall beare me witnesse, that in these dangers of the highest nature and straine, I have not bene defective: and that neither the subuersions of States, nor the murthers of Kings, which may unhappily betide hereafter, shall have so free passage in the world for want of timely advertisement before."

          A REMONSTRANCE FOR THE RIGHT OF KINGS, AND THE INDEPENDENCIE OF THEIR CROWNES. AGAINST AN ORATION OF THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS CARDINALL OF PERRON, PRONOUNCED IN THE CHAMBER OF THE THIRD ESTATE. THE 15. OF IANUAR. 1615
James inveighs against the doctrine of the Cardinall of Perron and comments on what he perceives to be the root of France's political troubles, "Now, haue not all the calamities, which the third Estate haue sought providently to preuent; haue they not all sprung from the Clergie, as from their proper and naturall fountaine? From whence did the last ciuill warres, wherein a world of blood was not more profusely then prodigiously and vnnaturally spilt, and wherein the parricide of King Henrie III. was impiously and abominably committed: from whence did those bloodie warres proceed, but from the deposing of the said King by the Head of the Church? Were they not Prelats, Curats, and Confessours; were they not Ecclesiastics, who partly by seditious preachments, and partly by secret confessions, powred many a iarre of oyle vpon this flame? Was not he that killed the forenamed King, was not he one of the Clergie? Was not Guignard a Iesuite? ...Did not Rauaillac that monster of men, vpon interrogatories made at his examination...referre his examiners to the Sermons made the Lent next before, where they might be satisfied concerning the causes of his abominable vndertaking and execution? Are not Bellarmine, Eudaemonoiohannes, Suarez, Becanus, Mariana, with such other monsters, who teach the doctrine of parricides...are they not all Clerics? are not all their bookes approoued and allowed...? What were the heads, the chiefe promoters, the complices of the powder-conspiracie in my Kingdome? were they not Ecclesiastics?"


A SPEACH, AS IT WAS DELIVERED IN THE VPPER HOVSE OF THE PARLIAMENT TO THE LORDS SPIRITVALL AND TEMPORALL, AND TO THE KNIGHTS, CITIZENS AND BURGESSES THERE ASSEMBLED, ON MVNDAY THE XIX DAY OF MARCH 1603. BEING THE FIRST DAY OF THE PARLIAMENT [1603, Workes pp. 485-497]
James renders thanks for the warm reception received from his new English subjects and reckons of the blessings that attend his coming to the English throne. He also commits to the making and executing of good laws and shares his thoughts on the religious state of his new realm--"At my first comming, although I found but one Religion, and that which by my selfe is professed, publickely allowed, and by the Law maintained: Yet found I another sort of Religion, besides a priuate Sect, lurking within the bowels of this Nation."


A SPEACH IN THE PARLIAMENT HOVSE, AS NEERE THE VERY WORDS AS COULD BE GATHERED AT THE INSTANT [ANNO 1605] [1605, Workes pp. 499-508]
In the wake of the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot, a thankful James addresses Parliament, rehearsing the great and miraculous deliverance that God has granted him.


A SPEACH TO BOTH THE HOVSES OF PARLIAMENT, DELIVERED IN THE GREAT CHAMBER AT WHITE-HALL, THE LAST DAY OF MARCH 1607 [1607, Workes pp. 509-525]
Here the king addresses the union of England and Scotland. He comments, "...I protest vnto you all, When I first propounded the Vnion, I then thought there could haue bene no more question of it, then of your declaration and acknowledgement of my right vnto this Crowne, and that as tvvo Twinnes, they would haue growne vp together. The errour was my mistaking; I knew mine owne ende, but not others feares...."


A SPEACH TO THE LORDS AND COMMONS OF THE PARLIAMENT AT WHITE-HALL, ON WEDNESDAY THE XXI OF MARCH. ANNO 1609 [1609, Workes pp. 527-548]
James' primary reason for calling this Parliament is his need for a subsidy to cover his necessities and expenses, e.g., the funeral of Elizabeth I, his coronation, entertaining dignitaries, maintaining troops, etc. He also addresses the Common Law and concerns of the Commonwealth such as the need to preserve woods. The king assures Parliament that although he is an absolute monarch, he will rule his actions according to his laws.


A SPEACH IN THE STARRE-CHAMBER, THE XX. OF JVNE. ANNO 1616 [1616, Workes pp. 549-569]
James addresses kingship, the deputation of judges, and the nature of the law and courts. He also addresses specific concerns of the Commonwealth, e.g., the overpopulation of London, the evacuation of the country, crime, recusants, etc.


A MEDITATION VPON THE LORDS PRAYER: WRITTEN BY THE KINGS MAIESTIE, FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL HIS SUBIECTS, ESPECIALLY OF SUCH AS FOLLOW THE COURT. [Workes pp. 571-599]
In this meditation, James commends prayer as the most excellent service that a Christian can render unto God and the Lord's prayer as, "the most perfect, vseful and comfortable," of all prayers. After noting the need to pray without ceasing, he comments, "...if euer this doctrine was needfull in any age, it is most in ours: for now our zeale to prayer is quite dried vp and cooled, and turned to pratling, especially in this isle, where the Puritanes will haue vs hunt for hearing of Sermons without ceasing, but as little prayer as yee will, turning the commandement of the Apostle from Pray continuallie to Preach continually...."

          THE PREFACE
Here James dedicates this meditation to Buckingham, his Courtier, closing with these words--"...how godly and vertuous all my advises haue euer been unto you, I hope you will faithfully witness to the world. Receive then this New-yeeres gift from me, as a token of my loue...praying God, that as you are regenerated and borne anew, so you may rise to him, and be sanctified in him for euer. Amen." In an epistle to his son, Charles10 , James notes that he dedicated this meditation to Buckingham, "in regard...of the necessity that Courtiers haue to pray (considering that among great resort of people they cannot euer be in good company, besides the many allurements they haue to sinne)...."

          A MEDITATION VPON THE LORDS PRAYER
An exploration of the Lord's prayer as found in Matthew chapter 6.

10Workes, p. 602


A MEDITATION VPON THE 27. 28. 29. VERSES OF THE XXVII CHAPTER OF SAINT MATTHEW OR A PATERNE FOR A KINGS INAVGVRATION [Workes pp. 601-621]
In this thought-provoking meditation, James draws an analogy between the events of Matthew 27:27-29 and a king's inauguration.

          THE EPISTLE DEDICATORIE
James dedicates this meditation to his son, Prince Charles, as a, "...short preparatiue for a Kings Inauguration, and a little forewarning of his great and heauie burthen...." He includes an interesting section on, "...what some kings of olde thought of the weight of a Diademe."

          ADVERTISEMENT TO THE READER
Here James explains his reasons for writing, "...I onely write this as a ground, whereupon I mean...to set doune at large...the whole principal points belonging to the office of a King....In the meane time, I haue made this as a short forewarning to my Son, that he may in time prepare himself for the bargaine, and study his craft...."

          A PATERNE FOR A KINGS INAVGVRATION
James parallels the soldiers' treatment of Christ and the elements of a king's inauguration. In the Epistle dedicatory, James explains the circumstances that gave rise to this meditation--"...one day reading priuatly to my selfe the passion of CHRIST, in the end of S. Matthewes Gospel, I lighted upon that part, where the Gouernors Souldiers mocked our Sauiour, with putting the ornaments of a King upon him. Which appeared to me to be so punctually set doune, that my head hammered upon it diuers times after, and specially the Croune of thornes went neuer out of my mind, remembring the thorny cares, which a King (if he haue a care of his office) must be subiect unto, as (God knowes) I daily and nightly feele in mine owne person. Whereupon I apprehended that it would bee a good paterne to put inheritors to kingdomes in minde of their calling, by the forme of their inauguration...."

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Keywords: James I, King James VI & I, Workes 1616, Works by James I, England, Scotland, The Workes of the Most High and Mightie Prince Iames, By the Grace of God, King of Great Britaine, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c., 1616, 1620, Works, Works of the Most High and Mightie Prince James, King James' writings.